adult immunization schedule, CDC recommendations, health, healthy, retirement, travel,
FEATURES VITALITY

Adult Vaccination Schedule

on
December 16, 2017

We think about vaccinations as something we got as children or something we made sure our own children received. But the need for vaccinations extends into our adult years. When was the last time you had a Tetanus shot? Do you get a flu vaccine every year? Have you ever had a Hepatitis A or B vaccine? Do you know at which age you should get a Shingles vaccine or a Pneumonia vaccine? 

recommended vaccinations for adults 19 and over

Get the official CDC list of recommended adult vaccinations.

Staying healthy in our adult years allows us to travel longer and further in life. One way to stay healthy is to keep up with your adult vaccinations.

According to the CDC:

You may not realize that you need vaccines throughout your life. Adults need to keep their vaccinations up to date because immunity from childhood vaccines can wear off over time. You are also at risk for different diseases as an adult. Vaccination is one of the most convenient and safest preventive care measures available.

Why should you continue your vaccine schedule well into adulthood? Vaccines can significantly reduce your chances of getting certain diseases. They work with your body’s natural defenses to help you safely develop immunity to disease. Additionally, they help protect others around you by reducing your chances of spreading disease. Staying current with your vaccinations also helps to reduce lost time from work.

I plan to retire early and spend my years traveling long and far. My focus at this time in my life, while I have time to plan and prepare, is to do what can I do now that will allow me to be able to enjoy my retirement to it’s fullest? My motivation is that, by taking action in my younger years, I can ensure vitality later in life. Keeping current with vaccinations helps prevent diseases that may otherwise prevent my travels years from now. 

Additionally, vaccines such as Tetanus and Hepatitis A and B are often recommended for travel to certain countries. It’s to my benefit to stay current instead of getting a handful of vaccines all at one time before traveling.

When traveling to a new country I always check the CDC’s page on recommended vaccines. I research the country I am headed to and decide which vaccines make sense for me. Some vaccines offer lifetime protection if you get the recommended doses. 

I hope the chart below will provide you with some guidance on the recommended vaccinations for adults ages 19 and over.  Click on the link to print the full version.

As always, use your own best judgment. Don’t forget to check the CDC’s website for additional information on vaccinations.

 

 

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Shara Jones
Norfolk, VA, USA

HI! I'm Shara, the life traveler behind this blog. I became a widow two days before my 49th birthday. And so began the second chapter of my life. Join me as I journey through this new phase of life, 50 years old, staring down the barrel of early retirement and everything that encompasses being happy and healthy in the second chapter of life.

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